propagandawar:

In 1965, at Jackson, Mississippi, Matt Herron took an iconic and ironic image from the civil rights era as a white policeman rips an American flag away from a young black boy, having already confiscated his ‘No More Police Brutality’ sign. Herron remembers the events that surrounded that World Press Photo prize wining photos:
The picture was taken at the side entrance to the Governor’s mansion on Capital Street in Jackson in the summer of 1965. The boy is Anthony Quinn, aged 5. His mother, Mrs. Ailene Quinn of McComb, Mississippi and her children were trying to see Governor Paul Johnson; they wanted to protest aganist the election of five Congressmen from districts where blacks were not allowed to vote. Refused admittance, they sat on the steps. The policeman struggling with Anthony is Mississippi Highway Patrolman Hughie Kohler. As Kohler attempted to confiscate the flag, Mrs. Quinn said: ‘Anthony, don’t let that man take your flag.’ Kohler went berserk, yanking Anthony off his feet.
In the South during the civil rights movement, the American flag was a potent symbol of support for racial integration (and support for federal law). Southerners who believed in racial segregation displayed Confederate flags instead. People were pulled from their cars by policemen and beaten simply for displaying an American flag on their license plates. So the simple act of a small child carrying an American flag represented defiance of Mississippi law and custom.
Anthony and his mother were arrested and hauled off to jail, which was a cattle stockade at the county fairground, since the city jails were already full of protesters. The Quinn protest was organized by COFO (Council of Federated Organizations), an umbrella organization responsible for most civil rights activities in the state. Today Anthony lives in Florida. I believe he is a lawyer. His mother died recently, and when Patrolman Kohler died a number of years ago, his obituary in the Jackson Daily News referred to this photograph and mentioned how Kohler regretted that moment ‘for the rest of his life’.”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ SOURCE: Iconic Photos / Famous, Infamous and Iconic Photos / Mississippi, Matt Herron http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2011/06/25/mississippi-matt-herron/
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propagandawar:

In 1965, at Jackson, Mississippi, Matt Herron took an iconic and ironic image from the civil rights era as a white policeman rips an American flag away from a young black boy, having already confiscated his ‘No More Police Brutality’ sign. Herron remembers the events that surrounded that World Press Photo prize wining photos:
The picture was taken at the side entrance to the Governor’s mansion on Capital Street in Jackson in the summer of 1965. The boy is Anthony Quinn, aged 5. His mother, Mrs. Ailene Quinn of McComb, Mississippi and her children were trying to see Governor Paul Johnson; they wanted to protest aganist the election of five Congressmen from districts where blacks were not allowed to vote. Refused admittance, they sat on the steps. The policeman struggling with Anthony is Mississippi Highway Patrolman Hughie Kohler. As Kohler attempted to confiscate the flag, Mrs. Quinn said: ‘Anthony, don’t let that man take your flag.’ Kohler went berserk, yanking Anthony off his feet.
In the South during the civil rights movement, the American flag was a potent symbol of support for racial integration (and support for federal law). Southerners who believed in racial segregation displayed Confederate flags instead. People were pulled from their cars by policemen and beaten simply for displaying an American flag on their license plates. So the simple act of a small child carrying an American flag represented defiance of Mississippi law and custom.
Anthony and his mother were arrested and hauled off to jail, which was a cattle stockade at the county fairground, since the city jails were already full of protesters. The Quinn protest was organized by COFO (Council of Federated Organizations), an umbrella organization responsible for most civil rights activities in the state. Today Anthony lives in Florida. I believe he is a lawyer. His mother died recently, and when Patrolman Kohler died a number of years ago, his obituary in the Jackson Daily News referred to this photograph and mentioned how Kohler regretted that moment ‘for the rest of his life’.”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ SOURCE: Iconic Photos / Famous, Infamous and Iconic Photos / Mississippi, Matt Herron http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2011/06/25/mississippi-matt-herron/
Zoom Info

propagandawar:

In 1965, at Jackson, Mississippi, Matt Herron took an iconic and ironic image from the civil rights era as a white policeman rips an American flag away from a young black boy, having already confiscated his ‘No More Police Brutality’ sign. Herron remembers the events that surrounded that World Press Photo prize wining photos:

The picture was taken at the side entrance to the Governor’s mansion on Capital Street in Jackson in the summer of 1965. The boy is Anthony Quinn, aged 5. His mother, Mrs. Ailene Quinn of McComb, Mississippi and her children were trying to see Governor Paul Johnson; they wanted to protest aganist the election of five Congressmen from districts where blacks were not allowed to vote. Refused admittance, they sat on the steps. The policeman struggling with Anthony is Mississippi Highway Patrolman Hughie Kohler. As Kohler attempted to confiscate the flag, Mrs. Quinn said: ‘Anthony, don’t let that man take your flag.’ Kohler went berserk, yanking Anthony off his feet.

In the South during the civil rights movement, the American flag was a potent symbol of support for racial integration (and support for federal law). Southerners who believed in racial segregation displayed Confederate flags instead. People were pulled from their cars by policemen and beaten simply for displaying an American flag on their license plates. So the simple act of a small child carrying an American flag represented defiance of Mississippi law and custom.

Anthony and his mother were arrested and hauled off to jail, which was a cattle stockade at the county fairground, since the city jails were already full of protesters. The Quinn protest was organized by COFO (Council of Federated Organizations), an umbrella organization responsible for most civil rights activities in the state. Today Anthony lives in Florida. I believe he is a lawyer. His mother died recently, and when Patrolman Kohler died a number of years ago, his obituary in the Jackson Daily News referred to this photograph and mentioned how Kohler regretted that moment ‘for the rest of his life’.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SOURCE: Iconic Photos / Famous, Infamous and Iconic Photos / Mississippi, Matt Herron http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2011/06/25/mississippi-matt-herron/

thisisme-hereiam:

specialnights:

In 1981 the trial of Josephus Andersonan, an African American charged with the murder of a white policeman, took place in Mobile. At the end of the case the jury was unable to reach a verdict. This upset members of the Ku Klux Klan who believed that the reason for this was that some members of the jury were African Americans. At a meeting held after the trial, Bennie Hays, the second-highest ranking official in the Klan in Alabama said: “If a black man can get away with killing a white man, we ought to be able to get away with killing a black man.”

Nineteen-year-old Michael Donald was on his way to the store in 1981 when two members of the United Klans of America ( Bennie Hays’s son, Henry Hays, and James Knowles) abducted him, beat him, cut his throat and hung his body from a tree on a residential street in Mobile, Ala.

A short investigation took place with the local police claiming that Donald had been murdered over a disagreement with a drugs deal. Donald’s mother, Beulah Mae Donald, knowing her son didn’t involve himself with drugs, was determined to get justice. She contacted Jessie Jackson who came to Mobile and led a protest march about the failed police investigation.

Less than 30 years ago.

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 
Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.
Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.
Zoom Info
thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 
Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.
Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.
Zoom Info
thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 
Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.
Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.
Zoom Info
thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 
Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.
Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.
Zoom Info
thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 
Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.
Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.
Zoom Info
thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 
Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.
Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.
Zoom Info

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 

Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.

Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.

aka14kgold:

angelatheangryone:

In case you haven’t seen the incredible ad against the football team from Washington’s name that will air in some cities during the NBA Finals …

(my one beef is that they didn’t use any famous Native women (not even Sacajawea) but I guess they were going for name recognition, which is extremely low for important and influential Native women, and although it stinks, the message in this case is too important to cloud.)

Sending it ‘round again—this is such a fantastic ad. 

CHANGE THE NAME

Quote IconDon’t get stuck. Move, travel, take a class, take a risk. There is a season for wildness and a season for settledness, and this is neither. This season is about becoming. Don’t lose yourself at happy hour, but don’t lose yourself on the corporate ladder either. Stop every once in a while and go out to coffee or climb in bed with your journal. Now is your time. Walk closely with people you love. Don’t get stuck in the past, and don’t try to fast-forward yourself into a future you haven’t yet earned. Give today all the love and intensity and courage you can, and keep travelling honestly along life’s path.

(via young-wanderer)

nalapenthera:

a—fri—ca:

Adinkra symbols
The Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Ashanti of Ghana and the Gyaman of Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, logos and advertising. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. The symbols have a decorative function but also represent objects that encapsulate evocative messages that convey traditional wisdom, aspects of life or the environment. There are many different symbols with distinct meanings, often linked with proverbs. They were one of the means for the transmission of a complex and nuanced body of practice and belief.
> Adinkra symbols
********
Photo 1 > Africa
Photo 2 > Adinkra symbols
Photo 3 > Site
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nalapenthera:

a—fri—ca:

Adinkra symbols
The Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Ashanti of Ghana and the Gyaman of Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, logos and advertising. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. The symbols have a decorative function but also represent objects that encapsulate evocative messages that convey traditional wisdom, aspects of life or the environment. There are many different symbols with distinct meanings, often linked with proverbs. They were one of the means for the transmission of a complex and nuanced body of practice and belief.
> Adinkra symbols
********
Photo 1 > Africa
Photo 2 > Adinkra symbols
Photo 3 > Site
Zoom Info
nalapenthera:

a—fri—ca:

Adinkra symbols
The Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Ashanti of Ghana and the Gyaman of Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, logos and advertising. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. The symbols have a decorative function but also represent objects that encapsulate evocative messages that convey traditional wisdom, aspects of life or the environment. There are many different symbols with distinct meanings, often linked with proverbs. They were one of the means for the transmission of a complex and nuanced body of practice and belief.
> Adinkra symbols
********
Photo 1 > Africa
Photo 2 > Adinkra symbols
Photo 3 > Site
Zoom Info

nalapenthera:

a—fri—ca:

Adinkra symbols

The Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Ashanti of Ghana and the Gyaman of Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, logos and advertising. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. 

The symbols have a decorative function but also represent objects that encapsulate evocative messages that convey traditional wisdom, aspects of life or the environment. There are many different symbols with distinct meanings, often linked with proverbs. They were one of the means for the transmission of a complex and nuanced body of practice and belief.

Adinkra symbols

********

Photo 1 > Africa

Photo 2 > Adinkra symbols

Photo 3 > Site

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